Insurance Bad Faith

When an insurance company improperly denies a claim or otherwise treats its policyholders unfairly, it is breaking the law. Such wrongdoing is typically called "insurance bad faith."

The most common types of bad faith include:

  • Deliberate misrepresentations of policy language to avoid paying for coverage;
  • Unreasonable delay in resolving a claim;
  • Failure to investigate a claim;
  • Arbitrary demands for proof of policyholder's loss;
  • Coercive settlement tactics;
  • Failure to disclose policy provisions;
  • Use of improper standard to deny a claim;
  • Compelling a policyholder to contribute to a settlement amount;
  • Improper litigation conduct; and
  • Failing to maintain investigative procedures.
  • Deliberate misrepresentations of policy language to avoid paying for coverage;
  • Unreasonable delay in resolving a claim;
  • Failure to investigate a claim;
  • Arbitrary demands for proof of policyholder's loss;
  • Coercive settlement tactics;
  • Failure to disclose policy provisions;
  • Use of improper standard to deny a claim;
  • Compelling a policyholder to contribute to a settlement amount;
  • Improper litigation conduct; and
  • Failing to maintain investigative procedures.

Courts often award large punitive damages to victims of bad faith insurers. The amount assessed against the insurer is usually based on the insurance company's assets and not necessarily on the losses suffered by the policyholder. At LaCourse Law, our attorneys will work hard to make sure you get the compensation you deserve.

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